Anglicanism and the eucharistic sacrifice

I may have misunderstood Mommy but it seems that she thinks Anglicans have historically rejected the eucharist as a sacrifice.

The ancient Elizabethan prayer book, after the Communion, reads as follows:

O LORDE and heavenly father, we thy humble servaunts, entierly desire thy fatherly goodnes mercifully to accept this our Sacrifice of praise and thankesgeving moste humblye besechynge thee to graunte, that by the merites and death of thy sonne Jesus Christ, and throughe faith in his bloude, we (and all thy whole church,) may obteine remission of our sinnes, and al other benefites of his passion. And here we offer and presente unto the, O Lord, our selves, our soules, and bodies, to be a reasonable, holy, and lively sacrifice unto the, humblye beseching the, that al we which be partakers of this holye communion, may be fulfilled with thy grace, and heavenly benediction. And although we be unworthye throughe our manifolde sinnes, to offer unto the any sacrifice, yet we beseche the to accept this our bounden duty and service, not weighing our merites, but pardoning our offences, throughe Jesus Christ our Lord, by whom and with whom, in the unitie of the holy ghoste, all honour and glorye be unto the, O father almighty, world without ende. Amen. (BCP, 1559)

Perhaps  I misread this but this is also oft repeated in the Anglican BCP of 1928. This is the one my own church uses. Further, the 1662 BCP has this show up after an Our Father is said. I have always understood these words of the Book of Common Prayer to imply that the Eucharist is a sacrificial meal. Or at least ambiguous enough not to explicitly reject the sacrificial nature of the meal. This is one thing with Elizabeth’s prayer book–it certainly muddied the waters in regard to Communion and seems to continue to do so amongst Anglicans today.

 

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About newenglandsun

A student. Male. Passionate. Easily offended. Child-like wonderer. Growing in faith, messing up daily.
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